Canadian Nationalist Front

The Canadian Nationalist Front was formerly known as the White Nationalist Front until 2016. It’s founder, Kevin Roger Goudreau, announced the name change on the now defunct StormFront neo-nazi website.

This is how they describe themselves:

We are a White Nationalist organization that would like to see proper immigration reforms, stopping the flow of third world immigrants and would like to see the deportation of any not born here and a return to Canada’s original White-European and Native Aboriginal ethnic make up.

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Traditionalist Workers Party (TWP)

Background

In 2013, Matthew Heimbach — a young rising star in the white supremacist world who had led the White Student Union at Towson University in Maryland — joined with Matthew Parrott to found a white nationalist group they dubbed the Traditionalist Youth Network (TYN). Featuring a blog and a podcast, the group’s mission was “to provide resources and support to independent groups of high school and college students throughout North America who are learning about the Traditionalist School of thought” — a reference to an ideology that calls for a return to “traditional” values, including the central claim that nations should be racially and culturally homogenous. Heimbach and Parrot went on, in 2015, to create the Traditionalist Worker Party (TWP) as the political wing of the TYN.

The TWP’s goal, according to a platform statement on its website, is this: “While we have candidates for political office and will run campaigns, that work is secondary to our first priority, which is local organizing and advocacy for real-life working families who share our identitarian and traditionalist vision.” (Identitarianism is a closely related ideology that emerged in recent years in Europe.) The group uses the slogan “Local solutions to the globalist problem,” a reference to the idea that globalization, the knitting together of nations and national economies throughout the developed world, is destroying racially homogenous communities and nations.

The TWP/TYN is part and parcel of the American “Alternative Right,” an umbrella term for a racist ideology that scorns mainstream conservatism and argues that white people and white culture in America are under threat from the forces of political correctness and multiculturalism. It is also “traditionalist” and “identitarian.”

The group’s version of “traditionalism” has its roots in the “radical traditionalism” espoused by mid-20th century Italian “philosopher” Julius Evola, a fascist thinker who believed that Jews were to blame for the modern materialism and democracy that he thought subverted the natural order of the world. The TWP website includes the group’s definition of traditionalism: “Traditionalism, properly applied, makes us as autonomous and self-governing as possible in relation to the modernist societies that we live in.” It defines traditions as “positive cultural interactions that have existed over a long period of time” and says “those traditions have existed for a long time, because they work. They have formed European-American mores.” The traditionalist ideology sees adherence to those “mores” as the best way to organize society, and argues that a traditionalist lifestyle can successfully supplant the state, since “the family is the natural enemy of the state.”

“Identitarianism” refers to a movement that emerged in recent years in France that advocates for culturally and ethnically homogenous communities and blames liberals for selling out their country. Generation Identitaire, the youth wing of the anti-immigrant Bloc Identitaire movement in France, is known for its racist and xenophobic anti-Muslim stunts, like serving soups containing pork in Muslim neighborhoods. The ideology has its roots in the European New Right, or Nouvelle Droite, founded by French academic Alain de Benoist, who advocated against melting-pot societies and immigration while claiming to oppose biological racism.

The TWP positions itself as being in favor of diversity — what it terms “ethnopluralism.” But what it means by that word is a diversity of nations around the globe that are each racially and culturally homogenous. In a section on its website defining the term, it says that “ethnopluralists argue that the liberal multiculturalism is false, as it promotes a melting pot which leads to the disappearance of ethnicities, cultures or races through miscegenation and therefore is in fact monoculturalism.” TWP is against racial intermarriage, no surprise given its platform statements.

The “Folk” section of the TWP platform puts the group’s white nationalist views, and associated anti-immigrant vitriol, clearly on display. It says that communities should be able to determine their own “religious and ethnic character” without government interference, that American 14th Amendment birthright citizenship should be revoked, and that the borders should be secured with National Guard troops. One platform plank, “Stop Discrimination Against Whites,” claims that “our government is stacking the deck against White families,” and says that TWP “opposes all racial quotas in education, hiring, and government contracts.”

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Ku Klux Klan (KKK)

The Ku Klux Klan (pronounced /ˈkuː ˈklʌks ˈklæn, ˈkjuː/),[a] commonly called the KKK or simply the Klan, is the name of three distinct movements in the United States that have advocated extremist reactionary positions such as white supremacy, white nationalism, anti-immigration and—especially in later iterations—Nordicism, anti-Catholicism and antisemitism. Historically, the KKK used terrorism—both physical assault and murder—against groups or individuals whom they opposed. All three movements have called for the “purification” of American society and all are considered right-wing extremist organizations.

The first Klan flourished in the Southern United States in the late 1860s, then died out by the early 1870s. It sought to overthrow the Republican state governments in the South during the Reconstruction Era, especially by using violence against African American leaders. With numerous chapters across the South, it was suppressed around 1871, through federal law enforcement. Members made their own, often colorful, costumes: robes, masks and conical hats, designed to be terrifying and to hide their identities.

The second group was founded in the the South in 1915 and it flourished nationwide in the early and mid-1920s, including urban areas of the Midwest and West. Taking inspiration from the film Birth of a Nation, which mythologized the founding of the first Klan, it employed marketing techniques and a popular fraternal organization structure. Rooted in local Protestant communities, it opposed Catholics and Jews, while also stressing its opposition to the Catholic Church at a time of high immigration from mostly Catholic nations of southern and eastern Europe. This second organization adopted a standard white costume and used code words which were similar to those used by the first Klan, while adding cross burnings and mass parades to intimidate others. It rapidly declined in the later half of the 1920s.

The third and current manifestation of the KKK emerged after WWII, in the form of localized and isolated groups that use the KKK name. They have focused on opposition to the Civil Rights Movement, often using violence and murder to suppress activists. It is classified as a hate group by the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center. As of 2016, the Anti-Defamation League puts total Klan membership nationwide at around 3,000, while the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) puts it at 6,000 members total.

The second and third incarnations of the Ku Klux Klan made frequent references to America’s “Anglo-Saxon” blood, hearkening back to 19th-century nativism. Although members of the KKK swear to uphold Christian morality, virtually every Christian denomination has officially denounced the KKK.

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Proud Boys

Proud Boys is a far-right men’s organization founded in 2016 by Vice Media co-founder and former commentator Gavin McInnes. McInnes describes the organization as a “pro-Western fraternal organization” for men who “refuse to apologize for creating the modern world.” The group has been referred to as alt-right or alt-lite.

The group takes its name from the showtune “Proud of Your Boy,” a song introduced in the 2011 stage-show version of Disney’s Aladdin.

In 2017, Kyle Chapman, also known as “Based Stickman,” formed a new wing of the Proud Boys called the “Fraternal Order of the Alt-Knights” (FOAK).

Member initiation

The Proud Boys have a four-degree initiation process for new members. In the first degree, a recruit must declare “I am a Western chauvinist who refuses to apologize for creating the modern world.” According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the second degree involves five or more Proud Boys punching the recruit until he names five breakfast cereals. To earn the third degree, the recruit must get a Proud Boy tattoo. The fourth degree requires the recruit to get into a physical fight with an anti-fascist activist at a public rally.

Ten Tenets

The ten tenets of the Proud Boys are: 1) “venerating the housewife,” 2) closing all prisons, 3) arming the citizenry with guns, 4) legalizing drugs, 5) ending welfare, 6) ending immigration, 7) banning censorship, 8) glorifying entrepreneurs, 9) recognizing “the West is the Best,” and 10) “shutting down the government.”

Unofficial uniform

The Proud Boys have adopted a black Fred Perry polo shirt with yellow piping as their unofficial uniform. Fred Perry was previously associated with the Mod subculture and skinhead groups, including the British National Front. Fred Perry’s CEO John Flynn denounced the affiliation with the Proud Boys in a statement to CBC Radio saying, “We don’t support the ideals or the group that you speak of. It is counter to our beliefs and the people we work with.”

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Fraternal Order of Alt-Knights (FOAK)

Proud Boys is a far-right men’s organization founded in 2016 by Vice Media co-founder and former commentator Gavin McInnes. McInnes describes the organization as a “pro-Western fraternal organization” for men who “refuse to apologize for creating the modern world.” The group has been referred to as alt-right or alt-lite.

The group takes its name from the showtune “Proud of Your Boy,” a song introduced in the 2011 stage-show version of Disney’s Aladdin.

In 2017, Kyle Chapman, also known as “Based Stickman,” formed a new wing of the Proud Boys called the “Fraternal Order of the Alt-Knights” (FOAK).

Alt-Right

The alt-right, or alternative right, is a loosely defined group of people with far-right ideologies who reject mainstream conservatism in favor of white nationalism. White supremacist Richard Spencer initially promoted the term in 2010 in reference to a movement centered on white nationalism, and did so according to the Associated Press to disguise overt racism, white supremacism, and neo-Nazism. The term drew considerable media attention and controversy during and after the 2016 US presidential election.

Alt-right beliefs have been described as isolationist, protectionist, antisemitic, and white supremacist, frequently overlapping with Neo-Nazism, nativism and Islamophobia, antifeminism, misogyny, and homophobia, right-wing populism, and the neoreactionary movement. The concept has further been associated with several groups from American nationalists, neo-monarchists, men’s rights advocates, and the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump.

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