Richard Wilson Preston – L2 Criminal

Name: Richard Wilson Preston
Photo:

Mugshot:

Level: L2 – Criminal
Aliases: Imperial Wizard of the Confederate White Knights
Twitter: None
Facebook: None
Location: Baltimore, MA (Currently in Custody)
Education: None
Employment: Unknown
Hate Groups: KKK (Confederate White Knights of the KKK)

Date: 2013-2017

Proof:

“Ellen Drisgill said she was shocked when FBI agents came to her house and arrested her son, a KKK member who police say fired a gun during a recent white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.
..
Local authorities in Charlottesville recently charged her son, Richard Wilson Preston Jr., with discharging a firearm within 1,000 feet of a school during the rally Aug. 12.

The American Civil Liberties Union said it had provided law enforcement officials with a video of the shooting before Preston’s arrest. It shows a man yelling and firing a handgun one time while standing on a sidewalk crowded with rally goers and counterprotesters. No one was struck.

Preston, 52, told a judge on Monday that he wouldn’t fight extradition from his home city of Baltimore to Charlottesville.
..
He also has spoken out publicly as an imperial wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. Mostly recently he spoke with NewsChannel 15 in the days after Charlottesville’s deadly protests, blaming the city’s mayor for the unrest.
..
A 2013 article and video from the News Journal in Wilmington, Delaware, shows Preston in KKK garb calling for the impeachment of then-President Barack Obama.”

Source

HateDB seeking staff and fact checkers

We are currently seeking individuals to help peer review submissions to the HateDB. This is an unpaid volunteer position.

Interested parties can e-mail admin [at] hatedb.space

HateDB submissions here

If you know of a group or person that should be in this database. Feel free to submit as much of the following information as possible on the subject.

Most importantly is the Proof section. Valid proofs are dated and sourced video and picture of racist, criminal or terrorist acts or statements. Valid proofs can also be reputable media reports of aforementioned.

E-mail all submissions to submit [at] hatedb.space — All submissions will remain anonymous. Your E-mail will be visible to site administration and staff.

Name:
Photo:
Aliases:
Twitter:
Facebook:
Location:
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Employment:
Hate Groups:

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Proof:

Jeremy Joseph Christian – L3 Terrorist

Name: Jeremy Joseph Christian
Photo:

Level: L3 – Terrorist
Aliases: None
Twitter: None
Facebook: jeremy.christian.581
Location: Portland, OR (Currently in custody)
Education: None
Employment: None
Hate Groups: Alt-Right

Date: 2000-2017

Proof:

The two victims who were killed in Friday afternoon’s attack have been identified as:

* 53-year-old Ricky John Best of Happy Valley, Oregon

* 23-year-old Taliesin Myrddin Namkai Meche of Southeast Portland

Best died at the scene and Namkai Meche died at the hospital.

The victim who was injured in the attack has been identified as 21-year-old Micah David-Cole Fletcher of Southeast Portland. He remains in a Portland hospital being treated for serious, but not believed to be life-threatening injuries.

The Oregon State Medical Examiner is conducting autopsies on Best and Namkai Meche today; results are not expected until later in the afternoon.

Homicide detectives are continuing to investigate the circumstances leading to the violent attack. As part of that investigation, detectives will extensively examine the background of the suspect, Jeremy Christian, including the information publicly available about the suspect’s extremist ideology. A review of the suspect’s record with the Portland Police Bureau shows he is not flagged as a criminal gang member, nor does he have any known mental health history listed.

The suspect will be arraigned on Tuesday May 30 (not Monday as originally released) in Multnomah County Court.

Source


Last month, even as hardcore activists with opposing ideologies clashed on the streets of Portland, Ore., as police officers kept watch, Jeremy Joseph Christian stood out.

He was big, standing over 6 feet tall and weighing 235 pounds, according to booking details. He wore an American flag cape. He was marching through the crowd yelling the racial epithet “n—-r” and throwing off one-armed Nazi salutes.

“I think this guy has a mental illness of some sort,” said Corey Pein, a freelance writer who encountered Christian that day and interviewed him for the local Williamette Week.

Now, Christian, 35, is accused of fatally stabbing two men Friday night as they tried to intervene when he shouted anti-Muslim hate speech at two young women on a light-rail train in Portland.

Source

Court Case No. 17CR34550
DA Case No. 2361727
Citation No. None

Charges:
AGGR MURDER (A Felony) X2
Bail: $0
Status: Unsentenced

ATT AGGR MURDER (A Felony)
Bail: $0
Status: Unsentenced

UNLAW USE WEAPON (C Felony) X5
Bail: $0
Status: Unsentenced

INTIMIDATION II (A Misdemeanor) X3
Bail: $0
Status: Unsentenced

MENACING (A Misdemeanor) X2
Bail: $0
Status: Unsentenced

ASSAULT I (A Felony)
Bail: $0
Status: Unsentenced

ASSAULT II (B Felony)
Bail: $0
Status: Unsentenced

Source

Ku Klux Klan (KKK)

The Ku Klux Klan (pronounced /ˈkuː ˈklʌks ˈklæn, ˈkjuː/),[a] commonly called the KKK or simply the Klan, is the name of three distinct movements in the United States that have advocated extremist reactionary positions such as white supremacy, white nationalism, anti-immigration and—especially in later iterations—Nordicism, anti-Catholicism and antisemitism. Historically, the KKK used terrorism—both physical assault and murder—against groups or individuals whom they opposed. All three movements have called for the “purification” of American society and all are considered right-wing extremist organizations.

The first Klan flourished in the Southern United States in the late 1860s, then died out by the early 1870s. It sought to overthrow the Republican state governments in the South during the Reconstruction Era, especially by using violence against African American leaders. With numerous chapters across the South, it was suppressed around 1871, through federal law enforcement. Members made their own, often colorful, costumes: robes, masks and conical hats, designed to be terrifying and to hide their identities.

The second group was founded in the the South in 1915 and it flourished nationwide in the early and mid-1920s, including urban areas of the Midwest and West. Taking inspiration from the film Birth of a Nation, which mythologized the founding of the first Klan, it employed marketing techniques and a popular fraternal organization structure. Rooted in local Protestant communities, it opposed Catholics and Jews, while also stressing its opposition to the Catholic Church at a time of high immigration from mostly Catholic nations of southern and eastern Europe. This second organization adopted a standard white costume and used code words which were similar to those used by the first Klan, while adding cross burnings and mass parades to intimidate others. It rapidly declined in the later half of the 1920s.

The third and current manifestation of the KKK emerged after WWII, in the form of localized and isolated groups that use the KKK name. They have focused on opposition to the Civil Rights Movement, often using violence and murder to suppress activists. It is classified as a hate group by the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center. As of 2016, the Anti-Defamation League puts total Klan membership nationwide at around 3,000, while the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) puts it at 6,000 members total.

The second and third incarnations of the Ku Klux Klan made frequent references to America’s “Anglo-Saxon” blood, hearkening back to 19th-century nativism. Although members of the KKK swear to uphold Christian morality, virtually every Christian denomination has officially denounced the KKK.

Associated imagery/logos:

Source

Kyle Sean Chapman – L2 Criminal

Name: Kyle Sean Chapman
Photo:

Level: L2 – Criminal
Aliases: Based Stickman, Alt-Knight
Twitter: @BasedStickMan_
Facebook: @kyle.chapman.543792
Location: Daly City, CA
Education: None
Employment: None
Hate Groups: Fraternal Order of Alt-Knights, Proud Boys, Alt-Right
Date: 1993-2017

Proof:

Kyle Chapman attacking someone at a protest

Kyle Chapman is the founder of the Fraternal Order of the Alt-Knights, A KKK inspired faction of the ‘Proud Boys‘ hate group.

Kyle “Based Stickman” Chapman was remanded to custody Friday by a judge in the felony case stemming from his appearing to wield a leaded stick at a March 4 alt-right rally in Berkeley. As KQED reports, he was arraigned in an Alameda County court on a charge of felony possession of a billy club and ordered to be held on $135,000 bail. As reported earlier, Chapman has two previous felony convictions on his record, and therefore could face stiffer sentencing if convicted again.
..
Chapman can be heard in the video below, posted July 12, discussing the “war against whites in Western society,” referring to the “three battles” in Berkeley, and saying that the only way the country will be saved is if “patriots” are willing to do physical battle in the streets and risk their lives.

Source

Court Documents:

Proud Boys

Proud Boys is a far-right men’s organization founded in 2016 by Vice Media co-founder and former commentator Gavin McInnes. McInnes describes the organization as a “pro-Western fraternal organization” for men who “refuse to apologize for creating the modern world.” The group has been referred to as alt-right or alt-lite.

The group takes its name from the showtune “Proud of Your Boy,” a song introduced in the 2011 stage-show version of Disney’s Aladdin.

In 2017, Kyle Chapman, also known as “Based Stickman,” formed a new wing of the Proud Boys called the “Fraternal Order of the Alt-Knights” (FOAK).

Member initiation

The Proud Boys have a four-degree initiation process for new members. In the first degree, a recruit must declare “I am a Western chauvinist who refuses to apologize for creating the modern world.” According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the second degree involves five or more Proud Boys punching the recruit until he names five breakfast cereals. To earn the third degree, the recruit must get a Proud Boy tattoo. The fourth degree requires the recruit to get into a physical fight with an anti-fascist activist at a public rally.

Ten Tenets

The ten tenets of the Proud Boys are: 1) “venerating the housewife,” 2) closing all prisons, 3) arming the citizenry with guns, 4) legalizing drugs, 5) ending welfare, 6) ending immigration, 7) banning censorship, 8) glorifying entrepreneurs, 9) recognizing “the West is the Best,” and 10) “shutting down the government.”

Unofficial uniform

The Proud Boys have adopted a black Fred Perry polo shirt with yellow piping as their unofficial uniform. Fred Perry was previously associated with the Mod subculture and skinhead groups, including the British National Front. Fred Perry’s CEO John Flynn denounced the affiliation with the Proud Boys in a statement to CBC Radio saying, “We don’t support the ideals or the group that you speak of. It is counter to our beliefs and the people we work with.”

Associated imagery/logos:

Source

Fraternal Order of Alt-Knights (FOAK)

Proud Boys is a far-right men’s organization founded in 2016 by Vice Media co-founder and former commentator Gavin McInnes. McInnes describes the organization as a “pro-Western fraternal organization” for men who “refuse to apologize for creating the modern world.” The group has been referred to as alt-right or alt-lite.

The group takes its name from the showtune “Proud of Your Boy,” a song introduced in the 2011 stage-show version of Disney’s Aladdin.

In 2017, Kyle Chapman, also known as “Based Stickman,” formed a new wing of the Proud Boys called the “Fraternal Order of the Alt-Knights” (FOAK).

Alt-Right

The alt-right, or alternative right, is a loosely defined group of people with far-right ideologies who reject mainstream conservatism in favor of white nationalism. White supremacist Richard Spencer initially promoted the term in 2010 in reference to a movement centered on white nationalism, and did so according to the Associated Press to disguise overt racism, white supremacism, and neo-Nazism. The term drew considerable media attention and controversy during and after the 2016 US presidential election.

Alt-right beliefs have been described as isolationist, protectionist, antisemitic, and white supremacist, frequently overlapping with Neo-Nazism, nativism and Islamophobia, antifeminism, misogyny, and homophobia, right-wing populism, and the neoreactionary movement. The concept has further been associated with several groups from American nationalists, neo-monarchists, men’s rights advocates, and the 2016 presidential campaign of Donald Trump.

Source

Donald John Trump – L1 Moderate

Name: Donald John Trump
Photo:

Level: L1 Moderate
Aliases: The Don, Donald Drumpf
Twitter: @realDonaldTrump
Facebook: @DonaldTrump
Location: Washington, DC
Education: B.Sc Economics, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania Class of ’68
Employment: 45th President of the United States
Hate Groups: Alt-Right
Date: 1973 – 2017

Proof:
Justice Department sues Trump Management Corporation in 1973 for racial discrimination against black people. Donald Trump is President of the company at the time.

Two years later, Trump Management settled the case, promising not to discriminate against blacks, Puerto Ricans and other minorities.

Three years after the first suit Trump Management Corporation is sued again by the Justice Department for continuing to discriminate against black applicants.

The New Jersey Casino Control Commission fined the Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino $200,000 in 1992 because managers would remove African-American card dealers at the request of a certain big-spending gambler. A state appeals court upheld the fine.

Trump disparaged his black casino employees as “lazy” in vividly bigoted terms, according to a 1991 book by John O’Donnell, a former president of Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino.

“And isn’t it funny. I’ve got black accountants at Trump Castle and Trump Plaza. Black guys counting my money! I hate it,” O’Donnell recalled Trump saying. “The only kind of people I want counting my money are short guys that wear yarmulkes every day.”

“I think the guy is lazy,” Trump said of a black employee, according to O’Donnell. “And it’s probably not his fault because laziness is a trait in blacks. It really is, I believe that. It’s not anything they can control.”

Trump has also faced charges of reneging on commitments to hire black people. In 1996, 20 African Americans in Indiana sued Trump for failing to honor a promise to hire mostly minority workers for a riverboat casino on Lake Michigan.

Sources

At a campaign rally in June 2015 Donald Trump said the following:

“[Mexico] are sending people that have lots of problems, and they are bringing those problems to us. They are bringing drugs, and bringing crime, and their rapists,”

Source

Trump refers to neo-nazis as ‘very fine people’

“There’s blame on both sides,” the president told reporters in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, in a raucous free-for-all. “I have no doubt about it.”

He emphasized that many “bad people” turned out to oppose neo-Nazis and that “you also had people that were very fine people, on both sides.” Apart from the white supremacists, he insisted, there were also well-meaning, peaceful demonstrators who only wanted to air objections to the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee, the Confederate general.

That discounted the anti-Semitic, white separatist and anti-minority slogans and Nazi flags on display at the gathering.

Source